Social Intelligence Test


Test how well you can read emotions of others just by looking at their eyes.

The ability to read the emotions of others is linked to "social intelligence" which, in turn, is linked to performance on team-based problem solving tasks.

The test typically takes 10 minutes to complete.

 

This test requires a laptop or a tablet. It will not work on a phone. The test may also not work properly on older versions of Internet Explorer.

This is an implementation of the Reading the Mind in the Eyes test developed by prof. Simon Baron-Cohen at the University of Cambridge.

 

Please tell us a little bit about yourself. Why?

These questions are optional, but if you could answer at least the first six, that would really help us.

Have you taken this test before? (important)

How old are you? (important)

Compared to your family and friends,
how good are you at reading people's emotions? (important)

What is your gender? (important)

How often do you use a computer? (important)

What device are you using to click right now? (important)

In what country did you live most of your childhood?
(Please pick one that influenced you the most if you grew up in more than one)


In what country have you spent most of the past five years?




 

Instructions

This test will investigate your ability to read emotion from the eyes. You will be shown a pair of eyes with four emotion labels around it. You are to select which one of the four emotion words best describes the emotion that the eyes are showing. Please provide one best guess for each item.

There is one practice question followed by 36 test question.

We will tell you how you did compared to others at the end.

Progress: face

Do not press "Reload" or the back button. If you do, you will have to restart the experiment from scratch!



What emotion are the eyes showing?


Skip to Results
You are welcome to skip the rest of the experiment at any time, but this will affect the quality of your feedback. The more progress you make, the more confident the assessment gets. You cannot go back to this page once you viewed the results.

Instructions

This test will investigate your ability to read emotion from the eyes. You will be shown a pair of eyes with four emotion labels around it. You are to select which one of the four emotion words best describes the emotion that the eyes are showing. Please provide one best guess for each item.

 

How do you feel?

Select one or two emotions that best describe how you are feeling (optional).



 

How do you feel?

Select the figure that best describes how you are feeling (optional).

Valence Range 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
Completely
Unhappy














Completely
Happy


Arousal Range 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
Completely
Calm














Completely
Excited


 

Why have you decided to skip to the end of the experiment?

The test..
takes too long.
is too hard.
is too easy.
Other:


This question is optional, but if you could provide an answer, that would really help us improving our experiment.

 

A few questions while we prepare your results...



If you are not a native speaker of English, did you recognize all the words used to describe emotions?



Did you encounter any technical difficulties or interruptions during this study?  



Did you cheat or in any way provide false information? If yes, how?  
It's OK if you used a dictionary to lookup some words



Do you have any other comments for the researcher? Questions, Suggestions, or Concerns?



 

You answered % of the questions correctly.

How did others do on this test?
On average, other people answered 74% questions correctly. But we found that not everyone does the same on this test:

Does this test work equally well for all people around the world?
This test was developed in Great Britain and the images you saw were taken from British magazines in 1990's. Unsurprisingly, the test doesn't work perfectly for people who are not native speakers of English or for people who come from cultures that are very different from Britain's.

Should you worry if you got a low score?
No. Your screen lighting level, mood, fatigue and many other factors might have affected your score. The results of this test are useful when they are averaged across many people, but they can be inaccurate for any individual person.

Typical results. In the original experiments with this test, the average ratio of correct answers for British adults was 74%. The average result for students was 80%. However, individual results ranged from 49% to 100% as many factors may affect performance: the lighting, the quality of your screen, your emotional state, fatigue, not to mention knowledge of the English language.

Social intelligence and team-based problem solving. Recent research published in Science in 2010 demonstrated that there is a link between how well team members perform on this test and how well the team performs on complex problem solving tasks. In fact, the overall "social intelligence" (or "collective intelligence" as it is referred to in the paper) was more than five times more important to the team success than the average IQ of the team members!

Besides this test, there were two other factors that were found to be important for team success: how equally team members contributed to the conversations (teams where one person dominated the conversation performed less well than those where all members contributed roughly the same), and the number of women on the team (yes, the more women, the better the team did! Sorry guys...).

If you want to hear this from the horse's mouth, here is the paper:

Woolley, A. W., Chabris, C. F., Pentland, A., Hashmi, N., & Malone, T. W. (2010). Evidence for a Collective Intelligence Factor in the Performance of Human Groups. Science, 330(6004), 686-688.

Reading the Mind in the Eyes and Autism. This test was originally developed by prof. Simon Baron-Cohen at the University of Cambridge as part of his and his team's research on autism. Adults with Asperger Syndrome or high-functioning autism answered on average 63% correctly on this test. Again, large individual differences were observed. There is big overlap between the results of typical adults and adults with Asperger Syndrome.

The paper describing the version of the test used in this study is here:

Baron-Cohen, S., Wheelwright, S., Hill, J., Raste, Y., & Plumb, I. (2001). The "Reading the Mind in the Eyes" Test revised version: a study with normal adults, and adults with Asperger syndrome or high-functioning autism. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, and Allied Disciplines, 42(2), 241-251.

If you enjoyed this test

1. Tell your friends about this test

2. Follow us on Facebook to see results of our studies and to be among the first to hear about new tests.

3. And check out LabintheWild for more tests:

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Your score is out of 36

How did others do on this test?
The average score is 26. But we found that not everyone does the same on this test:

Does this test work equally well for all people around the world?
This test was developed in Great Britain and the images you saw were taken from British magazines in 1990's. Unsurprisingly, the test doesn't work perfectly for people who are not native speakers of English or for people who come from cultures that are very different from Britain's.

Should you worry if you got a low score?
No. Your screen lighting level, mood, fatigue and many other factors might have affected your score. The results of this test are useful when they are averaged across many people, but they can be inaccurate for any individual person.

Typical results. In the original experiments with this test, the average score for British adults was 26. The average result for students was 28. However, individual results ranged from 17 to 35 as many factors may affect performance: the lighting, the quality of your screen, your emotional state, fatigue, not to mention knowledge of the English language.

Social intelligence and team-based problem solving. Recent research published in Science in 2010 demonstrated that there is a link between how well team members perform on this test and how well the team performs on complex problem solving tasks. In fact, the overall "social intelligence" (or "collective intelligence" as it is referred to in the paper) was more than five times more important to the team success than the average IQ of the team members!

Besides this test, there were two other factors that were found to be important for team success: how equally team members contributed to the conversations (teams where one person dominated the conversation performed less well than those where all members contributed roughly the same), and the number of women on the team (yes, the more women, the better the team did! Sorry guys...).

If you want to hear this from the horse's mouth, here is the paper:

Woolley, A. W., Chabris, C. F., Pentland, A., Hashmi, N., & Malone, T. W. (2010). Evidence for a Collective Intelligence Factor in the Performance of Human Groups. Science, 330(6004), 686-688.

Reading the Mind in the Eyes and Autism. This test was originally developed by prof. Simon Baron-Cohen at the University of Cambridge as part of his and his team's research on autism. Adults with Asperger Syndrome or high-functioning autism scored 22 on average on this test. Again, large individual differences were observed. There is big overlap between the results of typical adults and adults with Asperger Syndrome.

The paper describing the version of the test used in this study is here:

Baron-Cohen, S., Wheelwright, S., Hill, J., Raste, Y., & Plumb, I. (2001). The "Reading the Mind in the Eyes" Test revised version: a study with normal adults, and adults with Asperger syndrome or high-functioning autism. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, and Allied Disciplines, 42(2), 241-251.

If you enjoyed this test

1. Tell your friends about this test

2. Follow us on Facebook to see results of our studies and to be among the first to hear about new tests.

3. And check out LabintheWild for more tests:

Nutrition Knowledge Test

Can you tell just by looking at a meal whether it is a significant source of protein, fat, or carbohydrates?
The test typically takes 10 minutes. Try it!

Multitasking Test

How well can you multitask? Compare yourself to others by taking this test!
The test typically takes 10 minutes. Try it!